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Author Topic: ABU MOUSAA AL-ASH'ARIY  (Read 2722 times)
UmmOmar
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« on: June 07, 2010, 03:27:29 AM »

سْمِ اللهِ، الحمد لله وَالصَّلَاةُ وَالسَّلَّامُ عَلَى رَسُولِ اللهِ

                                             Sincerity and Let Be What Will Be



       Who was this ruler about whom such good was said: `No horseman ever came to Basra who was better for its people than him"? Indeed, he was `Abd Allah Ibn Qais, nicknamed Abu Muusaa Al-Ash' ariy (رضى اللّهُ عنه).

        He departed his country and homeland of Yemen for Makkah immediately upon hearing of the appearance of a Messenger there who was calling to monotheism and inviting to Allah with clear vision and ordering noble morals. In Makkah, he sat in the presence of the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه و سلم) and received from him guidance and certainty. He then returned to his country carrying the word of Allah. Afterwards, he returned to the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) immediately after the victory over Khaibar. His arrival coincided with the arrival of Ja'far Ibn Abi Taalib, returning with his companions from Abyssinia, so the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) gave all of them a share of the booty.

        On this occasion, Abu Muusaa did not come alone, but with approximately 50 men from the people of Yemen, including his two brothers Abu Ruhm and Abu Burdah, to whom the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) taught Islam.

        The Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) named this delegation and its people the Ash'ariyiin. The Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) described them as the people with the most delicate feelings and kind, gentle hearts. That which is most often mentioned about them as the highest example of his Companions is as follows: "If they exhausted their food in a military campaign or their food became diminished, they would gather what they possessed in one garment and divide it among themselves equally. So they are from me and I from them."


        From that day, Abu Muusaa took his permanent and high place among the Muslims and believers who were destined to be the Companions of the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه و سلم) and his pupils, and to become the carriers of Islam to the world in every age and time.


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     Abu Muusaa was a wonderful combination of extraordinary attributes. He was a bold and daring fighter, a firm combatant when he was forced to fight, while at the same time he was peaceful, good, and gentle to the most extreme degree of goodness and kindness. He was a scholar who possessed comprehension, sound judgment, and judicious discrimination. He was intelligent, and his understanding excelled in the most complicated, abstruse and obscure issues which radiated in legal decisions and judgments, until it was said of him, "The judges of this nation are four: `Umar, `Aliy, Abu Muusaa and Zaid Ibn Thaabit."

        In addition to that, he possessed an innocent nature. Whoever attempted to deceive him in matters of Allah was himself deceived. He possessed great loyalty and responsibility and great trust of the people. If we wanted to choose a fact of his life as a slogan, it would be this expression: "Sincerity, and let be what will be."

        In the sphere of jihaad, Al-Ash'ariy carried his responsibility in such a glorious and heroic manner that it made the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه و سلم) call him, " Master of horsemen, Abu Muusaa." He shows us a picture of his life as a fighter when he says, "We went out with the Messenger of Allah on a military campaign and our feet were full of holes and my feet were also full of holes until I lost my toe nails and we wrapped our feet with rags."

        His goodness and the peace of his real conviction and inner-most thoughts were not provoked by an enemy in battle. He was in such a posture that he saw matters in complete clarity and he decided them with decisive willpower and determination. It happened that while the Muslims were conquering the kingdom of Persia, Al-Ash'ariy came down with his army upon the people of Isfahan, who agreed to pay him the jizyah so he made a peace settlement with them.

        However, it seems that they were not truthful in their agreement. They only wanted to make themselves ready for the opportunity to prepare a treacherous attack. Nevertheless, in the time of need the cleverness of Abu Muusaa was not oblivious to their secret plan. He perceived and saw through their scheme and the evil plans they were contriving, so when they began their attack the leader was not taken by surprise. Therefore, the war overwhelmed them, and the first half of the day was not over before he gained a decisive victory.

        In the battles in which the Muslims engaged against Imperial Persia, the performance of Abu Muusaa (May Allah be pleased with him) was outstanding, and his fighting for the cause of Allah was noble.

        In the Battle of Tustar particularly, in which Hurmuzan withdrew with his army to fortify his position and gathered massive armies, Abu Muusaa was the hero. On that day, the Commander of the Faithful `Umar supplied him with a massive number of Muslims, at the head of which were `Ammaar Ibn Yaasir, Al-Baraa' Ibn Maalik and Anas Ibn Maalik and Maja'ah Al-Bakriy and Salamah lbn Rajaa'. The two armies - the Muslims under the command of Abu Muusaa and the Persians under the command of Hurmuzan - met in the battle which was one of the fiercest in ruthlessness and violence. The Persians withdrew inside the fortified city of Tustar and the Muslims besieged it for many days until Abu Muusaa employed his skill and intelligence and sent 200 cavalry men with a Persian agent. Abu Muusaa instructed him to enter the fort in order to open the gate of the city in front of the advanced guard which he chose for the mission. The gates had hardly opened when the soldiers of the advanced guard charged on the fortified citadel until Abu Muusaa swooped down with his army in a massive attack.

        He captured this important fortified position in only hours, and the Persian leader surrendered, after which Abu Muusaa sent them to Al-Madiinah to learn the Commander of the Faithful's judgment. However, this fighter of great prowess did not leave the field of battle until he changed to a persistent worshiper with much weeping, and was mild-tempered, peaceable, and gentle-hearted as a sparrow.


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     He recited the Qur'aan with such a voice that made the inner heart of the one who listened to it tremble that the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) said about him, " Abu Muusaa was given a musical voice like the musical instruments of the people of Dawuud." Every time Umar (رضى اللّهُ عنه) saw him he called him to recite to him from the Book of Allah saying to him, "Make us aspire to our Lord, O Abu Muusaa."


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        Also, Abu Muusaa did not participate in fighting except against the army of the polytheists or armies fighting against the religion, wanting to extinguish the light of Allah Whenever there was a fight between Muslims, he indeed ran away from it and never had any role in it. This position of his was clear in the dispute between `Aliy and Mu'aawiyah and in the war which ignited between the Muslims.

        Indeed, the view of Abu Muusaa in the case of arbitration can be summarized by the fact that he saw the Muslims killing one another and each party fanatically clinging to imam (ruler). As he saw it, the situation between the combatants had reached a critical state that was impossible of resolve and placed the destiny of the Muslim nation on the edge of an abyss. In his opinion, the situation had reached a stage of deterioration. It was exemplified in the change of the whole situation, which thus required starting over again.

      Abu Muusaa (May Allah be pleased with him) had a position of trust and love with the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم) and a position of trust with his Companions and successors. In his life the Prophet (صلى الله عليه و سلم) gave him, along with Mu'aadh Ibn Jabal, the governorship over Yemen. After the death of the Messenger (صلى الله عليه و سلم), he returned to Al-Madinah to carry his responsibility in the great holy war which the Muslim armies engaged in against Persia and Rome.

        In the period of Umar the Commander of the Faithful (رضى اللّهُ عنه), Abu Muusaa was governor of Basra, and Caliph `Uthmaan (رضى اللّهُ عنه) put him in charge of Kufa. He was one of the people of the Qur'aan, those who memorized it, understood it, and acted on it. Some of his radiant words about the Qur'aan were "Follow the Qur'aan and do not desire that the Qur'aan should follow you."

        He was of the people of persistent worship and on the very days which almost caused the breath of people to pass away, he would yearn to fast and say, "Perhaps the thirst of the midday heat will be intercession for us on the Day of Judgment."

        On that Humid day, his appointed time of death came to him and covered his countenance with a radiance which is for those who hope for the mercy of Allah and a good reward. And the words which he was always repeating during his faithful life his tongue went on repeating while he was in the departing moments of death: "O Allah, You are peace and from You is peace."

taken from "Men Around The Messenger"


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And when My slaves ask you (O Muhammad SAW) concerning Me, then, I am indeed near (to them by My Knowledge). I respond to the invocations of the supplicant when he calls on Me (without any mediator or intercessor). So let them obey Me and believe in Me, so that they may be led aright. Qur'an (2:186)
chakula
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2010, 04:52:00 AM »

Salam,

Nice one sister, please keep it up.

Praise be to Allah.
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UmmOmar
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And in Allâh (Alone) let believers put their trust


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« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2010, 01:21:06 AM »

wa `alaykum as-salam wa ra7mat ALLAH

Jazakum ALLAH khaira
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And when My slaves ask you (O Muhammad SAW) concerning Me, then, I am indeed near (to them by My Knowledge). I respond to the invocations of the supplicant when he calls on Me (without any mediator or intercessor). So let them obey Me and believe in Me, so that they may be led aright. Qur'an (2:186)
 
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